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Nanomedicine. 2014 Nov;10(8):1853-61. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2014.04.009. Epub 2014 May 14.

Heparin conjugated quantum dots for in vitro imaging applications.

Author information

1
Nanomedicine and Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute for Molecular Medicine, St James' Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland.
2
Nanomaterials Research Group, School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.
3
Nanomedicine and Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute for Molecular Medicine, St James' Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructure and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: prinamea@tcd.ie.
4
Nanomaterials Research Group, School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland; Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructure and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
5
Nanomedicine and Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute for Molecular Medicine, St James' Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland; Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructure and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract

In this work heparin-gelatine multi-layered cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDgel/hep) were synthesised using a novel 'one-pot' method. The QDs produced were characterised using various spectroscopic and physiochemical techniques. Suitable QDs were then selected and compared to thioglycolic acid stabilised quantum dots (QDTGA) and gelatine coated quantum dots (QDgel) for utilisation in in vitro imaging experiments on live and fixed permeabilised THP-1, A549 and Caco-2 cell lines. Exposure of live THP-1 cells to QDgel/hep resulted in localisation of the QDs to the nucleus of the cells. QDgel/hep show affinity for the nuclear compartment of fixed permeabilised THP-1 and A549 cells but remain confined to cytoplasm of fixed permeabilised Caco-2 cells. It is postulated that heparin binding to the CD11b receptor facilitates the internalisation of the QDs into the nucleus of THP-1 cells. In addition, the heparin layer may reduce the unfavourable thrombogenic nature of quantum dots observed in vivo.

FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR:

In this study, heparin conjugated quantum dots were found to have superior imaging properties compared to its native counterparts. The authors postulate that heparin binding to the CD11b receptor facilitates QD internalization to the nucleus, and the heparin layer may reduce the in vivo thrombogenic properties of quantum dots.

KEYWORDS:

Heparin; Imaging applications; Multi-layered; Quantum dots

PMID:
24832962
DOI:
10.1016/j.nano.2014.04.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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