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Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2014 Jul;94(4):413-20. doi: 10.1016/j.tube.2014.03.012. Epub 2014 Apr 13.

The role of ancestry in TB susceptibility of an admixed South African population.

Author information

1
Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology, The DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical TB Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg 7505, South Africa.
2
Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology, The DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical TB Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg 7505, South Africa. Electronic address: egvh@sun.ac.za.

Abstract

Genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) has been well established and this, taken together with variation in susceptibility observed between different geographic and ethnic populations, implies that susceptibility to TB may in part be affected by ethnicity. In a previous genome-wide TB case-control study (642 cases and 91 controls) of the admixed South African Coloured (SAC) population, we found a positive correlation between African San ancestry and TB susceptibility, and negative correlations with European and Asian ancestries. Since genome-wide data was available for only a small number of controls in the previous study, we endeavored to validate this finding by genotyping a panel of ancestry informative markers (AIMs) in additional individuals, yielding a data set of 918 cases and 507 controls. Ancestry proportions were estimated using the AIMs for each of the source populations of the SAC (African San, African non-San, European, South Asian and East Asian). Using logistic regression models to test for association between TB and ancestry, we confirmed the substantial effect of ancestry on TB susceptibility. We also investigated the effect of adjusting for ancestry in candidate gene TB association studies of the SAC. We report a polymorphism that is no longer significantly associated with TB after adjustment for ancestry, a polymorphism that is significantly associated with TB only after adjustment for ancestry, and a polymorphism where the association significance remains unchanged. By comparing the allele frequencies of these polymorphisms in the source populations of the SAC, we demonstrate that association results are likely to be affected by adjustment for ancestry if allele frequencies differ markedly in the source populations of the SAC.

KEYWORDS:

Admixture; Ancestry informative markers; Association; Host genetics; Tuberculosis

PMID:
24832562
DOI:
10.1016/j.tube.2014.03.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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