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Carcinogenesis. 2014 Sep;35(9):2102-12. doi: 10.1093/carcin/bgu106. Epub 2014 May 15.

Maternal metabolic perturbations elicited by high-fat diet promote Wnt-1-induced mammary tumor risk in adult female offspring via long-term effects on mammary and systemic phenotypes.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology & Biophysics, Department of Pediatrics and Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA.
2
Department of Pediatrics and Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA.
3
Department of Physiology & Biophysics, Department of Pediatrics and Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA simmenrosalia@uams.edu.

Abstract

Many adult chronic diseases are thought to be influenced during early life by maternal nutrition; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Obesity-related diseases may be due partly to high fat consumption. Herein, we evaluated mammary tumor risk in female mouse mammary tumor virus-Wnt-1 transgenic (Tg) offspring exposed to high-fat diet (HFD) or control diet (CD) (45% and 17% kcal from fat, respectively) during gestation and lactation, with CD provided to progeny at weaning. In Tg offspring, maternal HFD exposure increased mammary tumor incidence and decreased tumor latency without affecting tumor volume. Tumor risk was associated with higher tumor necrosis factor-α and insulin and altered oxidative stress biomarkers in sera and with early changes in mammary expression of genes linked to tumor promotion [interleukin 6 (Il6)] or inhibition [phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (Pten), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2)]. Corresponding wild-type progeny exposed to maternal HFD displayed accelerated mammary development, higher mammary adiposity, increased insulin resistance and early changes in Pten, Bcl2 and Il6, than CD-exposed offspring. Dams-fed HFD showed higher serum glucose and oxidative stress biomarkers but comparable adiposity compared with CD-fed counterparts. In human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, sera from maternal HFD-exposed Tg offspring elicited changes in PTEN, BCL2 and IL6 gene expression, mimicking in vivo exposure; increased cell viability and mammosphere formation and induced measures [insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), IRS-2] of insulin sensitivity. Serum effects on IRS-1 were recapitulated by exogenous insulin and the PTEN-specific inhibitor SF1670. Hyperinsulinemia and PTEN loss-of-function may thus, couple maternal HFD exposure to enhanced insulin sensitivity via increased mammary IRS-1 expression in progeny, to promote breast cancer risk.

PMID:
24832086
PMCID:
PMC4146417
DOI:
10.1093/carcin/bgu106
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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