Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2014 Aug;28:25-32. doi: 10.1016/j.copbio.2013.10.012. Epub 2013 Nov 22.

Nanotubes in biological applications.

Author information

1
Howard P. Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, CBIS 4105, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA; Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
2
Howard P. Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, CBIS 4105, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA; Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA; Department of Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Electronic address: dordick@rpi.edu.
3
Howard P. Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, CBIS 4105, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA; Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Electronic address: kaner@rpi.edu.

Abstract

Researchers over the last few years have recognized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as promising materials for a number of biological applications. CNTs are increasingly being explored as potent drug carriers for cancer treatment, for biosensing, and as scaffolds for stem cell culture. Moreover, the integration of CNTs with proteins has led to the development of functional nanocomposites with antimicrobial properties. This review aims at understanding the critical role of CNTs in biological applications with a particular emphasis on more recent studies.

PMID:
24832071
DOI:
10.1016/j.copbio.2013.10.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center