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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2014 Jun;72(6):1078-83. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2014.02.005. Epub 2014 Feb 11.

Regeneration of periosteum by human bone marrow stromal cell sheets.

Author information

1
Graduate Student Researcher, Department of Bioengineering and Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
2
Dental Student, Center for Craniofacial Regeneration and Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
3
Professor, Center for Craniofacial Regeneration and Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, and McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA.
4
Professor, Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, Departments of Bioengineering and Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh and McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA. Electronic address: csfeir@pitt.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The presence of a functional periosteum accelerates healing in bone defects by providing a source of progenitor cells that aid in repair. We hypothesized that bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) sheets could be used to engineer functional periosteal tissues.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

BMSCs were cultured to hyperconfluence and produced sufficient extracellular matrix to form robust tissue sheets. The sheets were wrapped around calcium phosphate pellets and implanted subcutaneously in mice for 8 weeks. Histologic comparisons were made between calcium phosphate samples with and without BMSC sheet wraps. Bone and periosteum formation were analyzed through tissue morphology and tissue-specific protein expression.

RESULTS:

Calcium phosphate pellets wrapped in BMSC sheets regenerated a bone-like tissue, but pellets lacking the cell sheet wrap did not. The bone-like tissue seen on the calcium phosphate scaffolds wrapped with the BMSC sheets was enclosed within a periosteum-like tissue characterized morphologically and through expression of periostin.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data indicate that cell sheet technology has potential for regenerating a functional periosteum-like tissue that could aid in future orthopedic therapy.

PMID:
24831936
DOI:
10.1016/j.joms.2014.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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