Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Biomech. 2014 Jul 18;47(10):2314-20. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2014.04.036. Epub 2014 Apr 26.

The developing shoulder has a limited capacity to recover after a short duration of neonatal paralysis.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University, 660 South Euclid, Campus Box 8233, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
2
Department of Pathology, St Louis University Hospital, St Louis, MO, USA.
3
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University, 660 South Euclid, Campus Box 8233, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: ThomopoulosS@wudosis.wustl.edu.

Abstract

Mechanical stimuli are required for the proper development of the musculoskeletal system. Removal of muscle forces during fetal or early post-natal timepoints impairs the formation of bone, tendon, and their attachment (the enthesis). The goal of the current study was to examine the capacity of the shoulder to recover after a short duration of neonatal rotator cuff paralysis, a condition mimicking the clinical condition neonatal brachial plexus palsy. We asked if reapplication of muscle load to a transiently paralyzed muscle would allow for full recovery of tissue properties. CD-1 mice were injected with botulinum toxin A to paralyze the supraspinatus muscle from birth through 2 weeks and subsequently allowed to recover. The biomechanics of the enthesis was determined using tensile testing and the morphology of the shoulder joint was determined using microcomputed tomography and histology. A recovery period of at least 10 weeks was required to achieve control properties, demonstrating a limited capacity of the shoulder to recover after only two weeks of muscle paralysis. Although care must be taken when extrapolating results from an animal model to the human condition, the results of the current study imply that treatment of neonatal brachial plexus palsy should be aggressive, as even short periods of paralysis could lead to long-term deficiencies in enthesis biomechanics and shoulder morphology.

KEYWORDS:

Botulinum toxin A; Enthesis; Neonatal brachial plexus palsy; Rotator cuff; Supraspinatus tendon

PMID:
24831237
PMCID:
PMC4073632
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbiomech.2014.04.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center