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Prim Care. 2014 Jun;41(2):215-37. doi: 10.1016/j.pop.2014.02.003. Epub 2014 Mar 22.

Screening and prevention of sexually transmitted infections.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Center for Urban Population Health, City of Milwaukee Health Department, 841 North Broadway Street, 3rd Floor, Milwaukee, WI 53202, USA.
2
Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1100 Delaplaine Court, Madison, WI 53715-1896, USA.
3
Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 207 West Lincoln Street, Suite 1, Augusta, WI 54722, USA.
4
Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 1100 Delaplaine Court, Madison, WI 53715-1896, USA. Electronic address: sbschrag@wisc.edu.

Abstract

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are common and costly, in part because they are asymptomatic and result in serious complications. Primary care clinicians can easily diagnose and effectively treat most STIs. Clinicians should screen patients for STIs based on high-risk behaviors, and consult with local public health officials to adapt national screening guidelines to local epidemiology. Clinical encounters involving STI screening are opportunities to counsel patients on risk behaviors, and vaccinate against human papillomavirus and hepatitis B. Electronic health records and mobile phone apps show promise for improving the clinical care of STIs.

KEYWORDS:

Chlamydia; Gonorrhea; Human immunodeficiency virus; Prevention; Screening; Sexually transmitted infections; Syphilis; United States

PMID:
24830606
DOI:
10.1016/j.pop.2014.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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