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Angiology. 2015 Apr;66(4):339-45. doi: 10.1177/0003319714533588. Epub 2014 May 15.

Oxidative stress and paraoxonase 1 activity predict contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, School of Medicine, Kafkas University, Kars, Turkey.
2
Department of Cardiology, School of Medicine, Kafkas University, Kars, Turkey drmugur@yahoo.com.
3
Department of Cardiology, Yenimahalle State Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
4
Department of Cardiology, Adana Numune Training and Research Hospital, Adana, Turkey.
5
Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Harran University, Şanlıurfa, Turkey.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Mersin State Hospital, Mersin, Turkey.

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). We investigated the relationship between CIN with paraoxonase 1 (PON-1) activity and oxidative stress markers (total antioxidant status [TAS], total oxidant status [TOS], and oxidative stress index [OSI]) in patients with anterior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention; 289 consecutive patients with STEMI were prospectively included. The patients were divided into 2 groups: CIN (n = 69) and non-CIN (n = 220). Activity of PON-1 and TAS levels were significantly lower and OSI and TOS levels were significantly higher in patients with CIN compared to the non-CIN group (P < .05, for all). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, PON-1 activity and OSI as well as the amount of contrast medium and diabetes were independent predictors for CIN in patients with anterior STEMI. Activity of PON-1 and oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of CIN.

KEYWORDS:

contrast; infarction; nephropathy; oxidative stress; paraoxonase

PMID:
24830418
DOI:
10.1177/0003319714533588
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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