Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2014 May;7(3):414-22. doi: 10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.113.000159. Epub 2014 May 13.

Cross-sectional survey of workload and burnout among Japanese physicians working in stroke care: the nationwide survey of acute stroke care capacity for proper designation of comprehensive stroke center in Japan (J-ASPECT) study.

Author information

  • 1From the Departments of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology (K.N., M.T., Y.M.) and Department of Neurosurgery (H.K.), National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Japan; Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (F.N.); Department of Health Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan (S.F.); Department of Neurosurgery, Nakamura Memorial Hospital, Sapporo, Japan (J.N.); Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan (K.O.); Department of Neurosurgery, Chiba Cardiovascular Center, Ichihara, Japan (J.O.); Department of Neurosurgery, Kyorin University, Tokyo, Japan (Y.S.); Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan (S. Miyachi); Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan (I.N.); Department of Public Health, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan (S. Matsuda); Department of Nursing, School of Nursing, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan (K.K.); Department of Clinical Research Promotion, National Hospital Organization Nagoya Medical Center, Nagoya, Japan (A.K.); and Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan (K.I.). knishimu@res.ncvc.go.jp.
  • 2From the Departments of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology (K.N., M.T., Y.M.) and Department of Neurosurgery (H.K.), National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Japan; Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (F.N.); Department of Health Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan (S.F.); Department of Neurosurgery, Nakamura Memorial Hospital, Sapporo, Japan (J.N.); Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan (K.O.); Department of Neurosurgery, Chiba Cardiovascular Center, Ichihara, Japan (J.O.); Department of Neurosurgery, Kyorin University, Tokyo, Japan (Y.S.); Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan (S. Miyachi); Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan (I.N.); Department of Public Health, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan (S. Matsuda); Department of Nursing, School of Nursing, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan (K.K.); Department of Clinical Research Promotion, National Hospital Organization Nagoya Medical Center, Nagoya, Japan (A.K.); and Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan (K.I.).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Burnout is common among physicians and affects the quality of care. We aimed to determine the prevalence of burnout among Japanese physicians working in stroke care and evaluate personal and professional characteristics associated with burnout.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

A cross-sectional design was used to develop and distribute a survey to 11 211 physicians. Physician burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory General Survey. The predictors of burnout and the relationships among them were identified by multivariable logistic regression analysis. A total of 2724 (25.3%) physicians returned the surveys. After excluding those who were not working in stroke care or did not complete the survey appropriately, 2564 surveys were analyzed. Analysis of the participants' scores revealed that 41.1% were burned out. Multivariable analysis indicated that number of hours worked per week is positively associated with burnout. Hours slept per night, day-offs per week, years of experience, as well as income, are inversely associated with burnout. Short Form 36 mental health subscale was also inversely associated with burnout.

CONCLUSIONS:

The primary risk factors for burnout are heavy workload, short sleep duration, relatively little experience, and low mental quality of life. Prospective research is required to confirm these findings and develop programs for preventing burnout.

KEYWORDS:

neurosurgery; stroke; tissue plasminogen activator

PMID:
24823957
DOI:
10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.113.000159
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center