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J Formos Med Assoc. 2014 Jun;113(6):340-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jfma.2012.07.005. Epub 2012 Aug 11.

Clinical characteristics and outcomes of primary antibody deficiency: a 20-year follow-up study.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Pediatrics, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Yonghe Branch, New Taipei City, Taiwan, ROC.
2
Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC.
3
Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC. Electronic address: gicmbor@ntu.edu.tw.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE:

Primary antibody deficiency is the most common disorder among primary immunodeficiencies. Recurrent infection and chronic lung change often lead to mortality and morbidity.

METHODS:

This study focused on the clinical presentation, molecular diagnosis, and outcomes of primary antibody deficiency in Taiwan pediatric group. Medical records of patients with primary antibody deficiency during the period 1990-2010 were retrospectively reviewed in one medical center.

RESULTS:

Among the 34 patients evaluated, X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) (29.4%) and common variable immunodeficiency diseases (CVIDs) (29.4%) were the most common disorders presented with respiratory and skin infections. Some genotype/phenotype discordance was found in one family. Patients with XLA, CVID, and hyper-IgM syndrome without complications had higher trough and initial IgG levels, and shorter delays in diagnosis. Patients with trough IgG levels >700 mg/dL had less occurrence of bronchiectasis.

CONCLUSION:

These results summarized clinical manifestations of primary antibody deficiency in pediatric group in Taiwan. Clinicians should strive to shorten delays in diagnosis and maintain higher trough IgG levels to decrease subsequent mortality and morbidity.

KEYWORDS:

Taiwan; X-linked agammaglobulinemia; common variable immunodeficiency diseases; hyper-IgM syndrome; primary antibody deficiency

PMID:
24820629
DOI:
10.1016/j.jfma.2012.07.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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