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Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2014 Oct 3;54:83-91. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2014.05.001. Epub 2014 May 10.

Effects of antipsychotic D2 antagonists on long-term potentiation in animals and implications for human studies.

Author information

1
Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Temerty Centre for Therapeutic Brain Intervention, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.
2
Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Geriatric Psychiatry Division, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada; Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.
3
Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Temerty Centre for Therapeutic Brain Intervention, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada; Geriatric Psychiatry Division, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada; Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.
4
Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Temerty Centre for Therapeutic Brain Intervention, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada; Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.
5
Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Temerty Centre for Therapeutic Brain Intervention, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada; Geriatric Psychiatry Division, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada; Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: Tarek.Rajji@camh.ca.

Abstract

In people with schizophrenia, cognitive abilities - including memory - are strongly associated with functional outcome. Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a form of neuroplasticity that is believed to be the physiological basis for memory. It has been postulated that antipsychotic medication can impair long-term potentiation and cognition by altering dopaminergic transmission. Thus, a systematic review was performed in order to assess the relationship between antipsychotics and D2 antagonists on long-term potentiation. The majority of studies on LTP and antipsychotics have found that acute administration of antipsychotics was associated with impairments in LTP in wild-type animals. In contrast, chronic administration and acute antipsychotics in animal models of schizophrenia were not. Typical and atypical antipsychotics and other D2 antagonists behaved similarly, with the exception of clozapine and olanzapine. Clozapine caused potentiation independent of tetanization, while olanzapine facilitated tetanus-induced potentiation. These studies are limited in their ability to model the effects of antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia as they were largely performed in wild-type animals as opposed to humans with schizophrenia, and assessed after acute rather than chronic treatment. Further studies using patients with schizophrenia receiving chronic antipsychotic treatment are needed to better understand the effects of these medications in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Animals; Antipsychotics; D2; Humans; LTP; Neurophysiology

PMID:
24819820
PMCID:
PMC4138225
DOI:
10.1016/j.pnpbp.2014.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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