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Spinal Cord. 2014 Jul;52(7):547-50. doi: 10.1038/sc.2014.71. Epub 2014 May 13.

Pharmacological prophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis in acute spinal cord injury: an Indian perspective.

Author information

1
Spine Service, Indian Spinal Injuries Centre, New Delhi, India.
2
Research Department, Indian Spinal Injuries Centre, New Delhi, India.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Prospective randomized single blind study.

OBJECTIVES:

To find out the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in Indian acute spinal cord injury (ASCI) subjects with and without pharmacological prophylaxis.

SETTING:

Indian Spinal Injuries Centre.

METHODS:

Seventy four ASCI subjects were randomly divided into two groups with 37 subjects each: group I received no antithrombotic prophylaxis, and only physical measures like compression stockings were employed for prophylaxis, whereas group II received antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) along with physical measures as in group I. DVT was monitored through daily clinical assessment and doppler venous ultrasonography at 2 weeks.

RESULTS:

Out of 37 subjects in each group, eight (21.6%) developed DVT in group I and two (5.4%) in group II. The difference was significant (P-value=0.041). Six out of eight subjects who developed DVT in group I were asymptomatic. There was no incidence of significant DVT-related complications including pulmonary embolism in any of the subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is a significant incidence of DVT in Indian subjects with ASCI but definitely less than what has been reported in western literature. Pharmacological prophylaxis (LMWH in this study) significantly (P=0.041) decreases the incidence of DVT in subjects with ASCI. As there was no difference in the incidence of symptomatic DVT or related complications, a larger study would be required to conclude definitely on the role of pharmacological prophylaxis in the Indian population.

PMID:
24819510
DOI:
10.1038/sc.2014.71
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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