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Pediatr Res. 2014 Aug;76(2):202-10. doi: 10.1038/pr.2014.72. Epub 2014 May 12.

Maternal pregravid obesity changes gene expression profiles toward greater inflammation and reduced insulin sensitivity in umbilical cord.

Author information

1
1] Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas [2] Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas.
2
Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Maternal obesity is associated with unfavorable outcomes, which may be reflected in the as yet undiscovered gene expression profiles of the umbilical cord (UC).

METHODS:

UCs from 12 lean (pregravid BMI < 24.9) and 10 overweight/obese (pregravid BMI ≥ 25) women without gestational diabetes were collected for gene expression analysis using Human Primeview microarrays. Metabolic parameters were assayed in mother's plasma and cord blood.

RESULTS:

Although offspring birth weight and adiposity (at 2 wk) did not differ between groups, expression of 232 transcripts was affected in UC from overweight/obese compared with those of lean mothers. Gene-set enrichment analysis revealed an upregulation of genes related to metabolism, stimulus and defense response, and inhibitory to insulin signaling in the overweight/obese group. We confirmed that EGR1, periostin, and FOSB mRNA expression was induced in UCs from overweight/obese mothers, while endothelin receptor B, KLF10, PEG3, and EGLN3 expression was decreased. Messenger RNA expression of EGR1, FOSB, MEST, and SOCS1 were positively correlated (P < 0.05) with mother's first-trimester body fat mass (%).

CONCLUSION:

Our data suggest a positive association between maternal obesity and changes in UC gene expression profiles favoring inflammation and insulin resistance, potentially predisposing infants to develop metabolic dysfunction later on in life.

PMID:
24819376
PMCID:
PMC4135718
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2014.72
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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