Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Perinatol. 2015 Jan;32(1):57-62. doi: 10.1055/s-0034-1373846. Epub 2014 May 12.

Length of latency with preterm premature rupture of membranes before 32 weeks' gestation.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The George Washington University Biostatistics Center, Washington, District of Columbia.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham Alabama.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Case Western Reserve University-MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
7
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.
8
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University, New York, New York.
9
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida.
10
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the article is to describe latency for patients with preterm premature membrane rupture (PPROM) between 24(0/7) and 31(6/7) weeks' gestation.

STUDY DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of data collected prospectively in a multicenter clinical trial of magnesium sulfate for cerebral palsy prevention. Women with PPROM and fewer than six contractions per hour at enrollment who were candidates for expectant management (n = 1,377) were included in this analysis. Length of latency was calculated in days by subtracting the time of delivery from the time of membrane rupture.

RESULTS:

At each week of gestation, median latency between 24 and 28 weeks was similar at approximately 9 days, but it was significantly shorter with PPROM at 29, 30, and 31 weeks (p < 0.001). In addition, the percentage of patients remaining undelivered at 7 days and 14 days was similar for PPROM between 24 and 28 weeks, but it decreased significantly after that. For each gestational age, the proportion of patients remaining pregnant declined in a fashion similar to an exponential pattern.

CONCLUSION:

Median latency after PPROM is similar from 24 to 28 weeks' gestation, but it shortens with PPROM at and after 29 weeks.

PMID:
24819145
PMCID:
PMC4250427
DOI:
10.1055/s-0034-1373846
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Publication type, MeSH terms, Supplementary concept, Grant support

Publication type

MeSH terms

Supplementary concept

Grant support

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center