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Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2014 Sep;23(9):1181-92. doi: 10.1517/13543784.2014.918951. Epub 2014 May 12.

NMDA antagonists under investigation for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

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1
Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , Smętna 12, PL 31-343 Kraków , Poland szewczyk@if-pan.krakow.pl.

Erratum in

  • Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2014 Oct;23(10):1457.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Mood disorders, including depression, are becoming increasingly prevalent in the developed world. Furthermore, treatment of depression therapeutics, mainly influencing the serotonergic and adrenergic systems, is considered insufficient. The original NMDA-glutamate hypothesis mechanism of antidepressant action was first proposed ∼ 20 years ago. Since then, a number of preclinical and clinical studies have examined its rationale.

AREAS COVERED:

This review highlights the recent clinical evidence for the use of functional NMDA receptor antagonists as antidepressants. Furthermore, the authors present the mechanism(s) of antidepressant action derived mostly from preclinical paradigms.

EXPERT OPINION:

Currently, clinical studies mostly use ketamine (a noncompetitive high-potency NMDA antagonist) as an agent for rapid relief of depressive symptoms. However, due to the ketamine-induced psychotomimetic effects, new NMDA receptor antagonists (modulators) are continuously being introduced for rapid antidepressant action, especially for use in treatment-resistant patients. Recent clinical reports for the use of CP-101,606, MK-0657 (selective GluN2B subunit NMDA receptor antagonists), GLYX-13 and d-cycloserine (glycine site partial agonists) are optimistic but await further support.

KEYWORDS:

NMDA receptor; antagonists; antidepressant; channel; glycine site

PMID:
24818801
DOI:
10.1517/13543784.2014.918951
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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