Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Dent. 2014;2014:783948. doi: 10.1155/2014/783948. Epub 2014 Apr 8.

Trends in computer-aided manufacturing in prosthodontics: a review of the available streams.

Author information

1
School of Dentistry, Melbourne University, 720 Swanston Street, Carlton, Melbourne, VIC, 3010, Australia ; School of Computer Science and Software Engineering, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.
2
Department of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Otago, 310 Great King Street, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand.
3
School of Computer Science and Software Engineering, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.

Abstract

In prosthodontics, conventional methods of fabrication of oral and facial prostheses have been considered the gold standard for many years. The development of computer-aided manufacturing and the medical application of this industrial technology have provided an alternative way of fabricating oral and facial prostheses. This narrative review aims to evaluate the different streams of computer-aided manufacturing in prosthodontics. To date, there are two streams: the subtractive and the additive approaches. The differences reside in the processing protocols, materials used, and their respective accuracy. In general, there is a tendency for the subtractive method to provide more homogeneous objects with acceptable accuracy that may be more suitable for the production of intraoral prostheses where high occlusal forces are anticipated. Additive manufacturing methods have the ability to produce large workpieces with significant surface variation and competitive accuracy. Such advantages make them ideal for the fabrication of facial prostheses.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Hindawi Publishing Corporation Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center