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Biomaterials. 2014 Aug;35(24):6400-11. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2014.04.036. Epub 2014 May 9.

Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency in the cellular environment for different nanoparticle designs.

Author information

1
Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, UMR 7057, CNRS and Université Paris Diderot, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France.
2
Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, UMR 7154, CNRS and Université Paris Diderot, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 France.
3
INRA, UR1196 GPL, MIMA2- Plateau de Microscopie Electronique 78352 Jouy-en-Josas, France.
4
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, I-16163 Genova, Italy.
5
Laboratoire Physicochimie des Electrolytes, Colloïdes et Sciences Analytiques PECSA UMR 7195, Université Pierre et Marie Curie UPMC-CNRS, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France.
6
Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, UMR 7057, CNRS and Université Paris Diderot, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France. Electronic address: claire.wilhelm@univ-paris-diderot.fr.

Abstract

Magnetic hyperthermia mediated by magnetic nanomaterials is one promising antitumoral nanotherapy, particularly for its ability to remotely destroy deep tumors. More and more new nanomaterials are being developed for this purpose, with improved heat-generating properties in solution. However, although the ultimate target of these treatments is the tumor cell, the heating efficiency, and the underlying mechanisms, are rarely studied in the cellular environment. Here we attempt to fill this gap by making systematic measurements of both hyperthermia and magnetism in controlled cell environments, using a wide range of nanomaterials. In particular, we report a systematic fall in the heating efficiency for nanomaterials associated with tumour cells. Real-time measurements showed that this loss of heat-generating power occurred very rapidly, within a matter of minutes. The fall in heating correlated with the magnetic characterization of the samples, demonstrating a complete inhibition of the Brownian relaxation in cellular conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Cell interactions; Magnetic hyperthermia; Nanomagnetism; Nanomedicine; Nanoparticles

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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