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Curr Opin Chem Biol. 2014 Jun;20:46-53. doi: 10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.04.008. Epub 2014 May 9.

Faster fluorescence microscopy: advances in high speed biological imaging.

Author information

1
Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 13 South Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States. Electronic address: peter.winter@nih.gov.
2
Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 13 South Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States.

Abstract

The past decade has seen explosive growth in new high speed imaging methods. These can broadly be classified as either point-scanning (which offer better depth penetration) or parallelized systems (which offer higher speed). We discuss each class generally, and cover specific advances in diffraction-limited microscopes (laser-scanning confocal, spinning-disk, and light-sheet) and superresolution microscopes (single-molecule imaging, stimulated emission-depletion, and structured illumination). A theme of our review is that there is no free lunch: each technique has strengths and weaknesses, and an advance in speed usually comes at the expense of either spatial resolution or depth penetration.

PMID:
24815857
PMCID:
PMC4096075
DOI:
10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.04.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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