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J Subst Abuse Treat. 2014 Aug;47(2):140-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2014.03.004. Epub 2014 Apr 4.

Reasons for opioid use among patients with dependence on prescription opioids: the role of chronic pain.

Author information

1
McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St, Belmont, MA 02478, United States; Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck St, Boston, MA, 02115, United States. Electronic address: rweiss@mclean.harvard.edu.
2
McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St, Belmont, MA 02478, United States; Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck St, Boston, MA, 02115, United States; University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, 7526 Louis Pasteur MC7733, San Antonio, TX, 78229, United States.
3
McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St, Belmont, MA 02478, United States; Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck St, Boston, MA, 02115, United States.
4
Behavioral Science Research Unit, Mt. Sinai at St. Luke's, 1111 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY, 10025, United States.
5
Universidad San Francisco de Quinto, Escuela De Medicina, Quito, Ecuador.
6
Adapt, Inc., 548 SE Jackson St., Roseburg, OR 97470, United States.
7
University of New Mexico Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions (CASAA), 2650 Yale SE MSC11-6280 Albuquerque, NM 87106, United States.
8
University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, 7526 Louis Pasteur MC7733, San Antonio, TX, 78229, United States.

Abstract

The number of individuals seeking treatment for prescription opioid dependence has increased dramatically, fostering a need for research on this population. The aim of this study was to examine reasons for prescription opioid use among 653 participants with and without chronic pain, enrolled in the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study, a randomized controlled trial of treatment for prescription opioid dependence. Participants identified initial and current reasons for opioid use. Participants with chronic pain were more likely to report pain as their primary initial reason for use; avoiding withdrawal was rated as the most important reason for current use in both groups. Participants with chronic pain rated using opioids to cope with physical pain as more important, and using opioids in response to social interactions and craving as less important, than those without chronic pain. Results highlight the importance of physical pain as a reason for opioid use among patients with chronic pain.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic pain; Opioid analgesics; Opioid dependence; Prescription drug abuse; Relapse

PMID:
24814051
PMCID:
PMC4074437
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsat.2014.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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