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J Clin Anesth. 2014 May;26(3):238-42. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinane.2013.09.009. Epub 2014 May 9.

Defining the role for submental intubation.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
2
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
3
Division of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA; Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.
4
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.
5
Division of Plastic and Craniofacial Surgery, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA; Department of Surgery, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA. Electronic address: mlypka@cmh.edu.

Abstract

Submental intubation, a less invasive alternative to tracheostomy, was first described for acute airway management of maxillofacial trauma patients, where nasoendotracheal intubation was contraindicated and oral intubation was not possible due to the desire to establish dental relationships perioperatively. While submental intubation is used most commonly in trauma patients, the range of indications for its use has broadened to include many orthognathic and skull base surgical procedures. Submental intubation is a safe, effective technique for many maxillofacial procedures, requiring the cooperation of both anesthesiologists and maxillofacial surgeons.

KEYWORDS:

Intubation, submental; Maxillofacial trauma; Orthognatic surgery; Skull base surgery; Submental intubation

PMID:
24813811
DOI:
10.1016/j.jclinane.2013.09.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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