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J Nutr. 2014 Jul;144(7):1128S-36S. doi: 10.3945/jn.114.190728. Epub 2014 May 8.

Mushrooms and Health Summit proceedings.

Author information

1
Consultant to the Food and Agriculture Industries, Los Altos, CA mj@feeney.us.com.
2
Tufts Medical School and USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA.
3
Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA.
4
Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Beltsville, MD.
5
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Adelaide, Australia.
6
SR Strategy, LLC, Washington, DC.
7
Sylvan, Inc, Kittanning, PA.
8
Center for Plant and Mushroom Products for Health, Department of Food Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.
9
Monterey Mushrooms, Inc, Watsonville, CA.
10
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.
11
Systematic Mycology and Microbiology Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Beltsville, MD.
12
The Chinese University of Hong Kong, McKellar, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.
13
Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center and Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
14
International Center for Regulatory Science, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
15
The Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park, NY.
16
Nutrition Impact, LLC, Battle Creek, MI.
17
Nutrient Data Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Beltsville, MD.
18
NIH Division of Nutrition Research Coordination and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD.
19
Gourmet Mushrooms, Inc, Sebastopol, CA.
20
The Culinary Institute of America, St Helena, CA.
21
the Mushroom Council, San Jose, CA.
22
Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
23
Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, MD.
24
Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA.
25
Market and Trade Economics Division, Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.
26
CDT Consulting, LLC, Herndon, VA.
27
Research, Education, and Economics, USDA, Washington, DC; and.
28
Nutritional Immunology Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA.

Abstract

The Mushroom Council convened the Mushrooms and Health Summit in Washington, DC, on 9-10 September 2013. The proceedings are synthesized in this article. Although mushrooms have long been regarded as health-promoting foods, research specific to their role in a healthful diet and in health promotion has advanced in the past decade. The earliest mushroom cultivation was documented in China, which remains among the top global mushroom producers, along with the United States, Italy, The Netherlands, and Poland. Although considered a vegetable in dietary advice, mushrooms are fungi, set apart by vitamin B-12 in very low quantity but in the same form found in meat, ergosterol converted with UV light to vitamin D2, and conjugated linoleic acid. Mushrooms are a rare source of ergothioneine as well as selenium, fiber, and several other vitamins and minerals. Some preclinical and clinical studies suggest impacts of mushrooms on cognition, weight management, oral health, and cancer risk. Preliminary evidence suggests that mushrooms may support healthy immune and inflammatory responses through interaction with the gut microbiota, enhancing development of adaptive immunity, and improved immune cell functionality. In addition to imparting direct nutritional and health benefits, analysis of U.S. food intake survey data reveals that mushrooms are associated with higher dietary quality. Also, early sensory research suggests that mushrooms blended with meats and lower sodium dishes are well liked and may help to reduce intakes of red meat and salt without compromising taste. As research progresses on the specific health effects of mushrooms, there is a need for effective communication efforts to leverage mushrooms to improve overall dietary quality.

PMID:
24812070
PMCID:
PMC4056650
DOI:
10.3945/jn.114.190728
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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