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Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2014 Jun 15;306(12):G1099-107. doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.00155.2014. Epub 2014 May 8.

Activation of the gut calcium-sensing receptor by peptide agonists reduces rapid elevation of plasma glucose in response to oral glucose load in rats.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan;
2
Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; hira@chem.agr.hokudai.ac.jp.
3
Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; and.
4
Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan;

Abstract

The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in various tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. To investigate the role of gut CaSR on glycemic control, we examined whether single oral administration of CaSR agonist peptides affected the glycemic response in rats. Glucose tolerance tests were performed under oral or duodenal administration of various CaSR agonist peptides (╬│Glu-Cys, protamine, and poly-d-lysine hydrobromide) in conscious rats. Involvement of CaSR was determined by using a CaSR antagonist. Signaling pathways underlying CaSR agonist-modified glycemia were investigated using gut hormone receptor antagonists. The gastric emptying rate after the administration of CaSR agonist peptides was measured by the phenol red recovery method. Oral and duodenal administration of CaSR agonist peptides attenuated glycemic responses under the oral glucose tolerance test, but the administration of casein did not. The promotive effect on glucose tolerance was weakened by luminal pretreatment with a CaSR antagonist. Treatment with a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist partially diminished the glucose-lowering effect of peptides. Furthermore, the gastric emptying rate was decreased by duodenal administration of CaSR agonist peptides. These results demonstrate that activation of the gut CaSR by peptide agonists promotes glucose tolerance in conscious rats. 5-HT3 receptor and the delayed gastric emptying rate appear to be involved in the glucose-lowering effect of CaSR agonist peptides. Thus, activation of gut CaSR by dietary peptides reduces glycemic responses so that gut CaSR may be a potential target for the improvement of postprandial glycemia.

KEYWORDS:

dietary peptides; gastric emptying; glycemic control

PMID:
24812056
DOI:
10.1152/ajpgi.00155.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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