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Tree Physiol. 2014 May;34(5):524-33. doi: 10.1093/treephys/tpu027. Epub 2014 May 7.

Endophytic bacteria in plant tissue culture: differences between easy- and difficult-to-propagate Prunus avium genotypes.

Author information

1
Woody Plant and Propagation Physiology Section, Institute for Horticultural Production Systems, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Strasse 2, 30419 Hannover, Germany quambusch@baum.uni-hannover.de.
2
Department of Biology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
3
Woody Plant and Propagation Physiology Section, Institute for Horticultural Production Systems, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Strasse 2, 30419 Hannover, Germany.

Abstract

The endophytic bacterial communities of six Prunus avium L. genotypes differing in their growth patterns during in vitro propagation were identified by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Five morphologically distinct isolates from tissue culture material were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To detect and analyze the uncultivable fraction of endophytic bacteria, a clone library was established from the amplified 16S rDNA of total plant extract. Bacterial diversity within the clone libraries was analyzed by amplified ribosomal rDNA restriction analysis and by sequencing a clone for each identified operational taxonomic unit. The most abundant bacterial group was Mycobacterium sp., which was identified in the clone libraries of all analyzed Prunus genotypes. Other dominant bacterial genera identified in the easy-to-propagate genotypes were Rhodopseudomonas sp. and Microbacterium sp. Thus, the community structures in the easy- and difficult-to-propagate cherry genotypes differed significantly. The bacterial genera, which were previously reported to have plant growth-promoting effects, were detected only in genotypes with high propagation success, indicating a possible positive impact of these bacteria on in vitro propagation of P. avium, which was proven in an inoculation experiment.

KEYWORDS:

16S rDNA sequencing; amplified ribosomal rDNA restriction analysis; bacterial endophytes; in vitro culture; plant growth-promoting bacteria

PMID:
24812040
DOI:
10.1093/treephys/tpu027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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