Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2014 Sep;16(9):590-5. doi: 10.1089/dia.2013.0365. Epub 2014 May 8.

Artificial pancreas (AP) clinical trial participants' acceptance of future AP technology.

Author information

1
1 Sansum Diabetes Research Institute , Santa Barbara, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Artificial pancreas (AP) systems are currently an active field of diabetes research. This pilot study examined the attitudes of AP clinical trial participants toward future acceptance of the technology, having gained firsthand experience.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

After possible influencers of AP technology adoption were considered, a 34-question questionnaire was developed. The survey assessed current treatment satisfaction, dimensions of clinical trial participant motivation, and variables of the technology acceptance model (TAM). Forty-seven subjects were contacted to complete the survey. The reliability of the survey scales was tested using Cronbach's ╬▒. The relationship of the factors to the likelihood of AP technology adoption was explored using regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Thirty-six subjects (76.6%) completed the survey. Of the respondents, 86.1% were either highly likely or likely to adopt the technology once available. Reliability analysis of the survey dimensions revealed good internal consistency, with scores of >0.7 for current treatment satisfaction, convenience (motivation), personal health benefit (motivation), perceived ease of use (TAM), and perceived usefulness (TAM). Linear modeling showed that future acceptance of the AP was significantly associated with TAM and the motivation variables of convenience plus the individual item benefit to others (R(2)=0.26, P=0.05). When insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor use were added, the model significance improved (R(2)=0.37, P=0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

This pilot study demonstrated that individuals with direct AP technology experience expressed high likelihood of future acceptance. Results support the factors of personal benefit, convenience, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use as reliable scales that suggest system adoption in this highly motivated patient population.

PMID:
24811147
PMCID:
PMC4135316
DOI:
10.1089/dia.2013.0365
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center