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Crit Care Med. 2014 Sep;42(9):2075-82. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000000410.

Intra-aortic balloon pump effects on macrocirculation and microcirculation in cardiogenic shock patients supported by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation*.

Author information

1
1Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit, iCAN, Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France. 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Hôpital Bicêtre, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Paris Sud, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, UMRS INSERM 956, iCAN, Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France. 4Department of Cardiac Surgery, iCAN, Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study was designed to assess the effects on macrocirculation and microcirculation of adding an intra-aortic balloon pump to peripheral venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with severe cardiogenic shock and little/no residual left ventricular ejection.

DESIGN:

A prospective, single-center, observational study where macrocirculation and microcirculation were assessed with clinical-, Doppler echocardiography-, and pulmonary artery-derived hemodynamic variables and also cerebral and thenar eminence tissue oxygenation and side-stream dark-field imaging of sublingual microcirculation.

SETTING:

A 26-bed tertiary ICU in a university hospital.

PATIENTS:

We evaluated 12 consecutive patients before and 30 minutes after interrupting and restarting intra-aortic balloon pump.

INTERVENTIONS:

Measurements were performed before, and 30 minutes after interrupting and restarting intra-aortic balloon pump.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Stopping intra-aortic balloon pump was associated with higher pulmonary artery-occlusion pressure (19 ± 10 vs 15 ± 8 mm Hg, p = 0.01), increased left ventricular end-systolic (51 ± 13 vs 50 ± 14 mm, p = 0.05) and end-diastolic (55 ± 13 vs 52 ± 14 mm, p = 0.003) dimensions, and decreased pulse pressure (15 ± 13 vs 29 ± 22 mm Hg, p = 0.02). Maximum pulmonary artery-occlusion pressure reduction when the intra-aortic balloon pump was restarted was observed in the seven patients whose pulmonary artery-occlusion pressure was more than 15 mm Hg when intra-aortic balloon pump was off (-6.6 ± 4.3 vs -0.6 ± 3.4 mm Hg, respectively). Thenar eminence and brain tissue oxygenation and side-stream dark-field-assessed sublingual microcirculation were unchanged by stopping and restarting intra-aortic balloon pump.

CONCLUSIONS:

Restoring pulsatility and decreasing left ventricular afterload with intra-aortic balloon pump was associated with smaller left ventricular dimensions and lower pulmonary artery pressures but did not affect microcirculation variables in cardiogenic shock patients with little/no residual left ventricular ejection while on peripheral venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

PMID:
24810530
DOI:
10.1097/CCM.0000000000000410
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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