Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Vet Parasitol. 2014 Jul 14;203(3-4):339-42. doi: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2014.04.004. Epub 2014 Apr 13.

Dirofilaria immitis: an emerging parasite in dogs, red foxes and golden jackals in Hungary.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Parasitology, Fish and Bee Diseases, Veterinary Diagnostic Directorate, National Food Chain Safety Office, Tábornok utca 2, Budapest H-1143, Hungary.
2
Laboratory of Mammalian, Poultry and Wildlife Pathology, Veterinary Diagnostic Directorate, National Food Chain Safety Office, Tábornok utca 2, Budapest H-1143, Hungary.
3
Laboratory of Parasitology, Fish and Bee Diseases, Veterinary Diagnostic Directorate, National Food Chain Safety Office, Tábornok utca 2, Budapest H-1143, Hungary. Electronic address: SreterT@nebih.gov.hu.

Abstract

Hungary was not considered to be a heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) endemic country until 2007, when the first autochthonous canine infection was described. Herein we report additional autochthonous heartworm infections in two dogs (Canis familiaris), twenty red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) (n=534; prevalence: 3.7%; 95% CI=2.4-5.7%) and two golden jackals (Canis aureus) (n=27; prevalence: 7.4%; 95% CI=2.1-23.4%) coming from eight counties. The identification of the parasite was based on morphology, morphometrics and amplification of 12S rDNA followed by sequencing in all cases. Our results indicate that Hungary became a D. immitis endemic country in the past decade. The prevalence and intensity of heartworm infection in wild canids is similar to or lower than that observed in the Mediterranean countries of Europe (3.7-7.4% vs. 0.4-12.7% and 1.5 vs. 2.9-4.4 worms/animal). These findings are in line with the results of the recently developed climate based forecast model to predict the establishment of D. immitis in Hungary.

KEYWORDS:

Dirofilaria immitis; Distribution; Dog; Golden jackal; Heartworm; Prevalence; Red fox

PMID:
24810374
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetpar.2014.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center