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Int J STD AIDS. 2015 Mar;26(4):225-37. doi: 10.1177/0956462414532447. Epub 2014 May 8.

Correlates of prevalent sexually transmitted infections among participants screened for an HIV incidence cohort study in Kisumu, Kenya.

Author information

1
Centre for Global Health Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI)/CDC Program, Kisumu, Kenya FOtieno@kemricdc.org.
2
Centre for Global Health Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI)/CDC Program, Kisumu, Kenya.
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
4
School of Public Health, Faculty of Community and Health Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa.

Abstract

We determined the prevalence of four sexually transmitted infections and the demographic and behavioural correlates associated with having one or more sexually transmitted infections among participants in an HIV incidence cohort study in Kisumu, western Kenya. Participants were enrolled from a convenience sample and underwent aetiologic sexually transmitted infection investigation. Demographic and behavioural information were collected and basic clinical evaluation performed. Multiple regression analysis was done to determine variables associated with having one or more sexually transmitted infections. We screened 846, 18- to 34-year-olds. One-third had at least one sexually transmitted infection with specific prevalence being: syphilis, 1.6%; gonorrhoea, 2.4%; herpes simplex virus type-2, 29.1%; chlamydia, 2.8%; and HIV, 14.8%. Odds of having any sexually transmitted infection were higher among participants who were women, were aged 20-24 or 30-34 years compared to 18-19 years, had secondary or lower education compared to tertiary education, were divorced, widowed or separated compared to singles, reported having unprotected sex compared to those who did not, reported previous sexually transmitted infection treatment, and tested HIV-positive. Multiple strategies are needed to address the overall high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections as well as the gender disparity found in this Kenyan population. Structural interventions may be beneficial in addressing educational and socio-economic barriers, and increasing the uptake of health-promoting practices.

KEYWORDS:

Kenya; Kisumu; correlates; prevalence; sexually transmitted infection

PMID:
24810218
PMCID:
PMC4709839
DOI:
10.1177/0956462414532447
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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