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Br J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;205(2):120-6. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.113.139949. Epub 2014 May 8.

Developmental model of suicide trajectories.

Author information

1
Monique Séguin, PhD, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Department of Psychology, Gatineau, Québec, and McGill Group for Suicide Studies, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Québec; Guy Beauchamp, PhD, Marie Robert, PhD, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Department of Psychology, Gatineau, Québec; Mélanie DiMambro, MSc, Gustavo Turecki, MD, PhD, McGill Group for Suicide Studies, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Most developmental studies on suicide do not take into account individual variations in suicide trajectories.

AIMS:

Using a life course approach, this study explores developmental models of suicide trajectories.

METHOD:

Two hundred and fourteen suicides were assessed with mixed methods. Statistical analysis using combined discrete-time survival (DTS) and growth mixture modelling (GMM) generated various trajectories, and path analysis (Mplus) identified exogenous and mediating variables associated with these trajectories.

RESULTS:

Two groups share common risk factors, and independently of these major risk factors, they have different developmental trajectories: the first group experienced a high burden of adversity and died by suicide in their early 20s; and the second group experienced a somewhat moderate or low burden of adversity before they took their own life. Structural equation modelling identified variables specific to the early suicide trajectory: conduct and behavioural difficulties, social isolation/conflicts mediated by school-related difficulties, the end of a love relationship, and previous suicide attempts.

CONCLUSIONS:

Psychosocial adversity between 10 and 20 years of age may warrant key periods of intervention.

PMID:
24809398
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.113.139949
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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