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Am J Ind Med. 2014 Aug;57(8):940-9. doi: 10.1002/ajim.22340. Epub 2014 May 8.

Work stress, sleep deficiency, and predicted 10-year cardiometabolic risk in a female patient care worker population.

Author information

  • 1Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Work, Health and Wellbeing, Boston, Massachusetts; The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Erratum in

  • Am J Ind Med. 2015 Jan;58(1):112.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal effect of work-related stress, sleep deficiency, and physical activity on 10-year cardiometabolic risk among an all-female worker population.

METHODS:

Data on patient care workers (n=99) was collected 2 years apart. Baseline measures included: job stress, physical activity, night work, and sleep deficiency. Biomarkers and objective measurements were used to estimate 10-year cardiometabolic risk at follow-up. Significant associations (P<0.05) from baseline analyses were used to build a multivariable linear regression model.

RESULTS:

The participants were mostly white nurses with a mean age of 41 years. Adjusted linear regression showed that having sleep maintenance problems, a different occupation than nurse, and/or not exercising at recommended levels at baseline increased the 10-year cardiometabolic risk at follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

In female workers prone to work-related stress and sleep deficiency, maintaining sleep and exercise patterns had a strong impact on modifiable 10-year cardiometabolic risk.

KEYWORDS:

cardiometabolic risk; follow-up; nurses; physical activity; sleep maintenance; work-family conflict

PMID:
24809311
PMCID:
PMC4111954
DOI:
10.1002/ajim.22340
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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