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Transl Med UniSa. 2014 Apr 24;9:50-5. eCollection 2014 Apr.

Hydrocephalus onset after microsurgical or endovascular treatment for acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. Retrospective italian multicenter study.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosciences and Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences Division of Neurosurgery, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II , Naples, Italy.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, Treviso Regional Hospital-University of Padova , Treviso, Italy.
3
Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Units of Neurosurgery Careggi Hospital , Florence, Italy.
4
Ospedale S. Maria della Misericordia- S. Andrea delle Fratte, Università degli Studi di Perugia , Perugia, Italy.
5
Department of Neuroscience and Neurosurgery, San Bortolo Hospital , Vicenza, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronic shunt-dependent hydrocephalus is a complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Its incidence and risk factors have been described while the hydrocephalus onset in terms of days after treatment (microsurgical or endovascular) has not been yet analyzed.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

45 patients, treated for aSAH in 4 Italian Neurosurgical Departments, were retrospectively analyzed. It was calculated the time that elapses between treatment and hydrocephalus onset in 36 patients.

RESULTS:

Of the 45 shunted patients, 15 (33.3%) were included in the microsurgical group (group A) and 30 (66.6%) were in the endovascular one (group B). There was no difference of the hydrocephalus onset between the two groups (24,1 days, group A vs. 27,7 days, group B). The presence of intracerebral hematoma (ICH) caused a delay in the hydrocephalus onset after endovascular treatment in terms of 11,5 days compared to microsurgical group as well the absence of vasospasm determined a delay of 13,7 days (not statistically significant).

CONCLUSION:

No difference in terms of hydrocephalus onset after microsurgical or endovascular treatment has been demonstrated. Only the presence of ICH or the absence of vasospasm can cause a slight delay in the time of hydrocephalus onset in the endovascular series (not statistically significant). Long-term follow-up studies involving higher numbers of subjects are needed to better demonstrate this issue.

KEYWORDS:

Endovascular Treatment; Hydrocephalus; Intracranial Aneurysm; Microsurgical Treatment; Multicenter Study

PMID:
24809036
PMCID:
PMC4012376
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