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PLoS One. 2014 May 7;9(5):e96319. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0096319. eCollection 2014.

Dorsal striatal dopamine, food preference and health perception in humans.

Author information

  • 1Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California, United States of America.
  • 2Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California, United States of America; Center for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  • 3Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California, United States of America; Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.

Abstract

To date, few studies have explored the neurochemical mechanisms supporting individual differences in food preference in humans. Here we investigate how dorsal striatal dopamine, as measured by the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [(18)F]fluorometatyrosine (FMT), correlates with food-related decision-making, as well as body mass index (BMI) in 16 healthy-weight to moderately obese individuals. We find that lower PET FMT dopamine synthesis binding potential correlates with higher BMI, greater preference for perceived "healthy" foods, but also greater healthiness ratings for food items. These findings further substantiate the role of dorsal striatal dopamine in food-related behaviors and shed light on the complexity of individual differences in food preference.

PMID:
24806534
PMCID:
PMC4012945
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0096319
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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