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J Diabetes Res. 2014;2014:139215. doi: 10.1155/2014/139215. Epub 2014 Apr 3.

Relation of asymmetric dimethylarginine levels to macrovascular disease and inflammation markers in type 2 diabetic patients.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Izmir Ataturk Training and Education Hospital, Katip Celebi University, Turkey.
2
Department of Gastroenterology, Erzurum Regional Research and Hospital, Turkey.
3
Department of Endocrinology, Eskisehir Osmangazi University Medical School, Eskisehir, Turkey.

Abstract

AIM:

We aimed to determine the relation of asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) levels to atherosclerotic vascular disease and inflammation markers in type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

We recruited 50 type 2 diabetic patients with atherosclerosis, 50 type 2 diabetic patients without atherosclerosis, and 31 healthy control patients into our study. We obtained fasting serum and plasma samples and measured HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, C-peptide, creatinine, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, hsCRP, fibrinogen, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, total homocysteine, and ADMA levels. In addition, all of the patients were evaluated for carotid artery intima media thickness by ultrasound. We evaluated ADMA levels in healthy controls, diabetic patients with macrovascular complications, and diabetic patients without macrovascular complications and evaluated the relationship between ADMA levels and total homocysteine, inflammation markers, and macrovascular disease.

RESULTS:

Mean ADMA values in non-MVD and control groups were significantly lower than in MVD group (0.39 ± 0.16, 0.32 ± 0.13, 0.52 ± 0.23, P < 0.05, resp.). These three variables (carotid intima-media thickness, inflammatory markers, and ADMA levels) were significantly higher in diabetes group than control (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

There is a relationship between ADMA and macrovascular disease in type 2 diabetes, but further studies are needed to understand whether increased ADMA levels are a cause of macrovascular disease or a result of macrovascular disease.

PMID:
24804267
PMCID:
PMC3996885
DOI:
10.1155/2014/139215
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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