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Development. 2014 Jun;141(11):2331-8. doi: 10.1242/dev.108795. Epub 2014 May 6.

Non-invasive long-term fluorescence live imaging of Tribolium castaneum embryos.

Author information

1
Physical Biology/Physikalische Biologie (IZN, FB 15), Buchmann Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (BMLS), Cluster of Excellence Frankfurt - Macromolecular Complexes (CEF - MC), Goethe University - Frankfurt am Main (Campus Riedberg), Max-von-Laue-Straße 15, Frankfurt am Main D-60348, Germany.
2
Physical Biology/Physikalische Biologie (IZN, FB 15), Buchmann Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (BMLS), Cluster of Excellence Frankfurt - Macromolecular Complexes (CEF - MC), Goethe University - Frankfurt am Main (Campus Riedberg), Max-von-Laue-Straße 15, Frankfurt am Main D-60348, Germany ernst.stelzer@physikalischebiologie.de.

Erratum in

  • Development. 2014 Jun;141(11):2361.

Abstract

Insect development has contributed significantly to our understanding of metazoan development. However, most information has been obtained by analyzing a single species, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Embryonic development of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum differs fundamentally from that of Drosophila in aspects such as short-germ development, embryonic leg development, extensive extra-embryonic membrane formation and non-involuted head development. Although Tribolium has become the second most important insect model organism, previous live imaging attempts have addressed only specific questions and no long-term live imaging data of Tribolium embryogenesis have been available. By combining light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy with a novel mounting method, we achieved complete, continuous and non-invasive fluorescence live imaging of Tribolium embryogenesis at high spatiotemporal resolution. The embryos survived the 2-day or longer imaging process, developed into adults and produced fertile progeny. Our data document all morphogenetic processes from the rearrangement of the uniform blastoderm to the onset of regular muscular movement in the same embryo and in four orientations, contributing significantly to the understanding of Tribolium development. Furthermore, we created a comprehensive chronological table of Tribolium embryogenesis, integrating most previous work and providing a reference for future studies. Based on our observations, we provide evidence that serosa window closure and serosa opening, although deferred by more than 1 day, are linked. All our long-term imaging datasets are available as a resource for the community. Tribolium is only the second insect species, after Drosophila, for which non-invasive long-term fluorescence live imaging has been achieved.

KEYWORDS:

Arthropod development; Coleoptera; DSLM; Embryogenesis; LSFM; Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy; Morphogenesis; Serosa scar; Tribolium castaneum

PMID:
24803590
DOI:
10.1242/dev.108795
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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