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Eur Spine J. 2014 Jul;23(7):1531-40. doi: 10.1007/s00586-014-3326-7. Epub 2014 May 7.

The pathological changes in the spinal cord after dural tear with and without autologous fascia repair.

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1
Graduate School of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, 116044, Liaoning, China, songyi19800913@163.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Dural tear is one of the common complications of spinal surgery leading to cerebrospinal fluid leakage followed by serial secondary symptoms. However, little is known about pathological changes of the spinal cord after dural tear. In the present study, we aimed to study the pathological changes in the spinal cord after dural tear with and without autologous fascia repair.

METHODS:

Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were used for dural tear and autologous fascia graft repair models. Three days and 1 week after surgery, the pathological changes in the spinal cord were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and spinal somatosensory evoked potentials test.

RESULTS:

Neuroinflammation was found in the parenchyma of the spinal cord characterized by gliosis, increased expression of inflammatory factors and infiltration of exogenesis immunocells in the rats without repair, which impaired the sensory conduction function of the spinal cord at the early stage of injury. Repairing with autologous fascia could attenuate neuroinflammation and help to maintain normal sensory conduction function of the spinal cord.

CONCLUSION:

Dural tear could cause a series of inflammatory reactions in the spinal cord and further impair its sensory conduction function at the early stage of injury. Repairing with autologous fascia was a necessary and effective way to prevent the neuroinflammation and to maintain the normal function of the spinal cord.

PMID:
24801575
DOI:
10.1007/s00586-014-3326-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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