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Nat Commun. 2014 May 6;5:3765. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4765.

Spider genomes provide insight into composition and evolution of venom and silk.

Author information

1
1] Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark [2] Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark [3].
2
1] Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark [2].
3
1] BGI-Tech, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China [2] Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark [3].
4
Bioinformatics Research Center (BiRC), Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
5
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
6
1] Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark [2] Bioinformatics Research Center (BiRC), Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
7
BGI-Tech, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China.
8
Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
9
1] Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark [2] Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
10
CLC bio, Silkeborgvej 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
11
1] Bioinformatics Research Center (BiRC), Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark [2] Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
12
1] Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark [2] Bioinformatics Research Center (BiRC), Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
13
1] BGI-Tech, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China [2] Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark [3] King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21441, Saudi Arabia.

Erratum in

  • Nat Commun. 2014;5:4590.

Abstract

Spiders are ecologically important predators with complex venom and extraordinarily tough silk that enables capture of large prey. Here we present the assembled genome of the social velvet spider and a draft assembly of the tarantula genome that represent two major taxonomic groups of spiders. The spider genomes are large with short exons and long introns, reminiscent of mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic analyses place spiders and ticks as sister groups supporting polyphyly of the Acari. Complex sets of venom and silk genes/proteins are identified. We find that venom genes evolved by sequential duplication, and that the toxic effect of venom is most likely activated by proteases present in the venom. The set of silk genes reveals a highly dynamic gene evolution, new types of silk genes and proteins, and a novel use of aciniform silk. These insights create new opportunities for pharmacological applications of venom and biomaterial applications of silk.

PMID:
24801114
PMCID:
PMC4273655
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4765
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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