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Eur J Psychotraumatol. 2014 May 2;5. doi: 10.3402/ejpt.v5.22612. eCollection 2014.

The University of Queensland study of physical and psychological outcomes for claimants with minor and moderate injuries following a road traffic crash (UQ SuPPORT): design and methods.

Author information

1
Centre of National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine (CONROD), School of Medicine, RBWH, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
2
School of Psychology, Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
3
Centre of National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine (CONROD), School of Medicine, RBWH, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia ; Australian Centre for Economic Research on Health, School of Economics, RBWH, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To date research investigating how mental health impacts physical recovery following a road traffic crash (RTC) has focused on cohorts with severe injuries. The UQ SuPPORT study aims to study the physical and psychological outcomes of claimants with minor injuries following an RTC under the Queensland common law compulsory insurance scheme.

OBJECTIVES:

This paper outlines the protocols of this study as a platform for future publications.

METHODS:

The 2-year longitudinal cohort study collected interview and survey data from claimants at 6, 12, and 24 months post-RTC. Measures used in the telephone interview included the DSM-IV Composite International Diagnostic Interview for posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive episode, panic attacks, agoraphobia; and self-reported disability (WHO-DAS-II). Quality of life (SF-36v2), alcohol use (AUDIT), social support (MSPSS), quality-adjusted life years (EQ-5D), and return to work outcomes were assessed via postal questionnaires.

RESULTS:

A total of 382 claimants consented to participate at the beginning of the study, and these participants were approached at each wave. Retention was high (65%). The average age of participants at Wave 1 was 48.6 years, with 65% of the sample sustaining minor injuries (Injury Severity Score=1-3).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study has collected a unique sample of data to investigate recovery patterns of claimants with minor injuries. Future publications will more fully assess the effects of the collected measures on recovery rates 2 years post-RTC.

KEYWORDS:

Posttraumatic stress; longitudinal; minor injuries; motor vehicle crash; physical recovery

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