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Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Aug 15;59(4):560-8. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciu327. Epub 2014 May 5.

Maternal immunization.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Seattle Children's Hospital, Washington.

Abstract

Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines.

KEYWORDS:

diphtheria; influenza; maternal immunization; pertussis; tetanus

PMID:
24799324
PMCID:
PMC4168293
DOI:
10.1093/cid/ciu327
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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