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Food Chem. 2014 Oct 1;160:346-56. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.03.112. Epub 2014 Apr 1.

Effect of fermentation on the antioxidant activity in plant-based foods.

Author information

1
Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, 4726 Seodong-daero, Daedeok-myeon, Anseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 456-756, Republic of Korea.
2
Korea Food Research Institute, 1201-62 Anyangpangyo-ro, Bundang-gu, Gyeonggi-do 463-746, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, 4726 Seodong-daero, Daedeok-myeon, Anseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 456-756, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: kimgeun@cau.ac.kr.

Abstract

This study provides an overview of the factors that influence the effect of fermentation on the antioxidant activity and the mechanisms that augment antioxidative activities in fermented plant-based foods. The ability of fermentation to improve antioxidant activity is primarily due to an increase in the amount of phenolic compounds and flavonoids during fermentation, which is the result of a microbial hydrolysis reaction. Moreover, fermentation induces the structural breakdown of plant cell walls, leading to the liberation or synthesis of various antioxidant compounds. These antioxidant compounds can act as free radical terminators, metal chelators, singlet oxygen quenchers, or hydrogen donors to radicals. The production of protease, α-amylase and some other enzymes can be influenced by fermentation that may have metal ion chelation activity. Because the mechanisms that affect antioxidant activity during fermentation are extremely varied, further investigation is needed to establish the precise mechanisms for these processes.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidative activity; Fermentation; Plant-based foods

PMID:
24799248
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.03.112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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