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Brain Stimul. 2014 May-Jun;7(3):483-5. doi: 10.1016/j.brs.2014.02.011. Epub 2014 Feb 22.

Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST).

Author information

1
American University of Beirut, Department of Psychiatry, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh, 1107 2020 Beirut, Lebanon.
2
Brain Stimulation Laboratory, Psychiatry Department, Medical University of South Carolina, USA.
3
Radiology Department, Medical University of South Carolina, USA.
4
Brain Stimulation Laboratory, Psychiatry Department, Medical University of South Carolina, USA; Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
6
American University of Beirut, Department of Psychiatry, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh, 1107 2020 Beirut, Lebanon. Electronic address: zn17@aub.edu.lb.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is limited by cognitive disturbance. Focal electrically-administered seizure therapy (FEAST) is designed to initiate focal seizures in the prefrontal cortex. To date, no studies have documented the effects of FEAST on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF).

METHODS:

A 72 year old depressed man underwent three single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans to capture the onset and resolution of seizures triggered with right unilateral FEAST. We used Bioimage Suite for within-subject statistical analyses of perfusion differences ictally and post-ictally compared with the baseline scan.

RESULTS:

Early ictal increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were limited to the right prefrontal cortex. Post-ictally, perfusion was reduced in bilateral frontal and occipital cortices and increased in left motor and precuneus cortex.

CONCLUSION:

FEAST appears to triggers focal onsets of seizure activity in the right prefrontal cortex with subsequent generalization. Future studies are needed on a larger sample.

KEYWORDS:

Brain stimulation; Depression; ECT; Electroconvulsive therapy; FEAST; Focally electrically administered seizure therapy; SPECT

PMID:
24795198
DOI:
10.1016/j.brs.2014.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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