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Cell Rep. 2014 May 8;7(3):722-34. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.04.025. Epub 2014 May 1.

Escargot restricts niche cell to stem cell conversion in the Drosophila testis.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA; Laboratory of Genetics, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Laboratory of Genetics, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
3
ARC Centre of Excellence in Biotechnology and Development, University of Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia; Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, University of Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia.
4
Laboratory of Genetics, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; GABBA, Instituto Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, University of Porto, Portugal.
5
Laboratory of Genetics, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.
6
Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
7
Department of Chemical Physiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
8
Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.
9
Laboratory of Genetics, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. Electronic address: leannejones@ucla.edu.

Abstract

Stem cells reside within specialized microenvironments, or niches, that control many aspects of stem cell behavior. Somatic hub cells in the Drosophila testis regulate the behavior of cyst stem cells (CySCs) and germline stem cells (GSCs) and are a primary component of the testis stem cell niche. The shutoff (shof) mutation, characterized by premature loss of GSCs and CySCs, was mapped to a locus encoding the evolutionarily conserved transcription factor Escargot (Esg). Hub cells depleted of Esg acquire CySC characteristics and differentiate as cyst cells, resulting in complete loss of hub cells and eventually CySCs and GSCs, similar to the shof mutant phenotype. We identified Esg-interacting proteins and demonstrate an interaction between Esg and the corepressor C-terminal binding protein (CtBP), which was also required for maintenance of hub cell fate. Our results indicate that niche cells can acquire stem cell properties upon removal of a single transcription factor in vivo.

PMID:
24794442
PMCID:
PMC4128242
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2014.04.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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