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Am J Prev Med. 2014 Aug;47(2):141-9. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.02.011. Epub 2014 Apr 30.

E-cigarette awareness and perceived harmfulness: prevalence and associations with smoking-cessation outcomes.

Author information

1
Center of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: andytan@alumni.upenn.edu.
2
Department of Communication, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois.

Erratum in

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, are increasingly advertised as replacements for regular cigarettes or cessation aids for smokers.

PURPOSE:

To describe the prevalence and correlates of e-cigarette awareness and perceived harmfulness among U.S. adults and analyze whether these variables are associated with smokers' past-year quit attempts and intention to quit.

METHODS:

Data were obtained from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS 4 Cycle 2), conducted from October 2012 to January 2013. Data analyses were performed from June to August 2013.

RESULTS:

Overall, 77% of respondents were aware of e-cigarettes. Of these, 51% believed e-cigarettes were less harmful than cigarettes. Younger, white (compared with Hispanic), more educated respondents and current or former smokers (compared with non-smokers) were more likely to be aware of e-cigarettes. Among those who were aware of e-cigarettes, younger; men (compared with women); white (compared with African-American); more educated respondents; and current smokers (compared with former and non-smokers) were more likely to believe that e-cigarettes were less harmful. [corrected].

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall e-cigarette awareness increased whereas the proportion of smokers who perceived less harm of e-cigarettes declined compared with earlier surveys. However, awareness and perceived harm of e-cigarettes did not show evidence of promoting smoking cessation at the population level.

PMID:
24794422
PMCID:
PMC4107147
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2014.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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