Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Virol. 2014 Jul;60(3):222-42. doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2014.03.023. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

Survey of congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) knowledge among medical students.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States. Electronic address: hrbaer@bcm.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States. Electronic address: hollycorwin@gmail.com.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States. Electronic address: alisonc@bcm.edu.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States. Electronic address: gdemmler@bcm.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) is a leading cause of congenital infection worldwide and the most common congenital infection in the United States, affecting 30,000-40,000 US newborns each year and causing permanent disabilities in 8000-10,000. In contrast to how commonly it occurs, physicians and medical students have little knowledge of cCMV.

OBJECTIVES:

To test the hypothesis medical students have little awareness about cCMV infection, and to collect data on medical students' knowledge about cCMV. The long-term goal of this project is to establish medical student awareness of cCMV infection and educate students about available treatments and strategies for prevention in at-risk populations.

STUDY DESIGN:

Medical students at one institution were surveyed by questionnaire to assess their knowledge of cCMV. Responses were described, quantified, and compared between groups.

RESULTS:

751 surveys were sent and 422 completed responses were received. Respondents were well distributed over all 4 medical school (MS) class years. Only 34% MS1 had heard of cCMV compared to 100% MS2-4 (P<0.0001). All MS2-4 who reported being "very familiar" with CMV learned about it in medical school, 80% in one lecture. MS1 respondents were significantly less knowledgeable about cCMV than MS2-MS4 respondents.

CONCLUSION:

A baseline lack of knowledge about cCMV was documented in first year medical students. A sharp increase in knowledge of cCMV occurred between MS1 and MS2 years, likely due to preclinical medical student curriculum. However, significant knowledge gaps regarding transmission and treatment were observed in all MS years, representing opportunities for medical education.

KEYWORDS:

Congenital infection; Cytomegalovirus; Knowledge; Medical education

PMID:
24794398
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcv.2014.03.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center