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Nat Mater. 2014 Jun;13(6):631-7. doi: 10.1038/nmat3960. Epub 2014 May 4.

Rigidity sensing and adaptation through regulation of integrin types.

Author information

1
1] Centre for Tumour Biology Barts Cancer Institute-a Cancer Research UK Centre of Excellence, Queen Mary, University of London, London EC1M 6BQ, UK [2] Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.
2
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.
3
Centre for Tumour Biology Barts Cancer Institute-a Cancer Research UK Centre of Excellence, Queen Mary, University of London, London EC1M 6BQ, UK.
4
CEIT and TECNUN (University of Navarra), 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian, Spain.
5
1] Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia, 08028 Barcelona, Spain [2] University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain [3] Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona, Spain.
6
1] Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia, 08028 Barcelona, Spain [2] University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

Tissue rigidity regulates processes in development, cancer and wound healing. However, how cells detect rigidity, and thereby modulate their behaviour, remains unknown. Here, we show that sensing and adaptation to matrix rigidity in breast myoepithelial cells is determined by the bond dynamics of different integrin types. Cell binding to fibronectin through either α5β1 integrins (constitutively expressed) or αvβ6 integrins (selectively expressed in cancer and development) adapts force generation, actin flow and integrin recruitment to rigidities associated with healthy or malignant tissue, respectively. In vitro experiments and theoretical modelling further demonstrate that this behaviour is explained by the different binding and unbinding rates of both integrin types to fibronectin. Moreover, rigidity sensing through differences in integrin bond dynamics applies both when integrins bind separately and when they compete for binding to fibronectin.

PMID:
24793358
PMCID:
PMC4031069
DOI:
10.1038/nmat3960
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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