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Water Res. 2014 Aug 1;59:99-111. doi: 10.1016/j.watres.2014.04.005. Epub 2014 Apr 16.

Decay of genetic markers for fecal bacterial indicators and pathogens in sand from Lake Superior.

Author information

1
Department of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, United States; Department of Biology, University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN 55812, United States.
2
Department of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, United States.
3
Department of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, United States; BioTechnology Institute, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, United States.
4
Department of Biology, University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN 55812, United States. Electronic address: rhicks@d.umn.edu.

Abstract

Beach sands impact water quality and pathogen loads, however, the comparative decay of the fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli, and pathogens in freshwater sand have not been examined. In this study, freshwater sand microcosms were inoculated with sewage and pure cultures of bacterial pathogens to compare relative decay rates. The abundance of culturable Enterococcus spp. and E. coli, genetic markers for Enterococcus spp. (Entero1), total Bacteroides (AllBac), and human-specific Bacteroides (HF183), and genetic markers for the pathogens Campylobacter jejuni, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Shigella flexneri were monitored over the course of two weeks using conventional culture methods and quantitative PCR (qPCR). The effect of moisture on the persistence of culturable FIB and all genetic markers was also determined. In addition, propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment was used to examine differences in the persistence of total genetic markers and those from live cells. Decay rates were statistically compared using Tukey's test. Moisture had a significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on the decay rates of culturable indicator bacteria, total AllBac markers, and genetic markers for FIB, Salmonella, and MRSA from live cells. At 14% sand moisture, the decay rate of total markers was slower than that of live cells for all qPCR assays, but at 28% moisture, there was no difference in the decay rates of total and live markers for any assay. AllBac and MRSA markers increased in sand at 28% moisture, probably indicating cellular growth. Overall, culturable FIB and HF183 had decay rates that were most comparable to the bacterial pathogen markers examined in this study, whereas Entero1 and AllBac rarely exhibited decay rates similar to the bacterial pathogens in this study. The choice of FIB for assessment of fecal contamination in freshwater sand should take into account the pathogen of concern and sand moisture conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Decay rate; Fecal indicator bacteria; Freshwater; Pathogenic bacteria; Persistence; Sand

PMID:
24793108
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2014.04.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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