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Resuscitation. 2014 Aug;85(8):1088-92. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.04.022. Epub 2014 May 2.

Feasibility of a first responder programme in rural Bangladesh.

Author information

1
International Drowning Research Centre - Bangladesh (IDRC-B), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Electronic address: aminur@ciprb.org.
2
International Drowning Research Centre - Bangladesh (IDRC-B), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Electronic address: thomasmecrow@yahoo.co.uk.
3
Centre for Injury Prevention Research, Bangladesh (CIPRB), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Electronic address: mashreky@ciprb.org.
4
Centre for Injury Prevention Research, Bangladesh (CIPRB), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Electronic address: fazlur@ciprb.org.
5
International Drowning Research Centre - Bangladesh (IDRC-B), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Electronic address: nusrat_160@hotmail.com.
6
International Drowning Research Centre - Bangladesh (IDRC-B), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Electronic address: kmahruba@yahoo.com.
7
Royal Life Saving Society Australia (RLSSA), Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: jscarr@rlssa.org.au.
8
The Alliance for Safe Children (TASC), Atlanta, USA. Electronic address: mlinnan@tasc-gcipf.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To develop and implement a first responder training programme, assess the feasibility of training lay persons with low literacy in rural Bangladesh and determine the acceptability of the programme in the community.

METHODS:

A first responder training programme including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was developed covering 20 villages in a rural sub-district in north-central Bangladesh. 2398 participants received training and 2120 graduated over a 14-month period. Responders were a mix of adolescents, community volunteers and community elders. The programme was evaluated through post-training assessment of knowledge and skills of participants and performance evaluation of trainers. A focus group discussion was used to assess the response of community leaders to usefulness and community acceptance of the programme.

RESULTS:

Materials developed for training include a low-literacy training manual, posters and a training video. Almost 90 per cent (88.4) of participants qualified in post training assessment. Adolescents and community volunteers had higher pass rates than community elders. In all, CPR skills showed a significant decline over 9 months of assessment, while first aid knowledge appeared stable over the same period. Community leaders considered the programme useful for the community and expressed their support for the programme.

CONCLUSION:

Developing a first responder training programme that includes CPR in a rural Bangladesh community is feasible if participants have secondary school attainment. Adolescents and young adults are suitable candidates. Evaluation is ongoing to see whether the programme graduates were able to reduce morbidity and mortality through effective first response efforts.

KEYWORDS:

CPR training; Drowning; LMICs; Low literacy setting; Resuscitation; Rural Bangladesh

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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