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Sports Health. 2014 May;6(3):197-202. doi: 10.1177/1941738114522412.

Relationship of the functional movement screen in-line lunge to power, speed, and balance measures.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, University of New England, Portland, Maine.
2
Department of Physical Therapy, University of New England, Portland, Maine ; Coastal Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Brunswick, Maine.
3
Department of Physical Therapy, University of New England, Portland, Maine ; MTI Physical Therapy, Bellevue, Washington.
4
Department of Physical Therapy, University of New England, Portland, Maine ; Excel Physical Therapy, Pinnacle Rehabilitation Network Affiliate, Raymond, New Hampshire.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The in-line lunge of the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) evaluates lateral stability, balance, and movement asymmetries. Athletes who score poorly on the in-line lunge should avoid activities requiring power or speed until scores are improved, yet relationships between the in-line lunge scores and other measures of balance, power, and speed are unknown.

HYPOTHESIS:

(1) Lunge scores will correlate with center of pressure (COP), maximum jump height (MJH), and 36.6-meter sprint time and (2) there will be no differences between limbs on lunge scores, MJH, or COP.

STUDY DESIGN:

Descriptive laboratory study.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level 3.

METHODS:

Thirty-seven healthy, active participants completed the first 3 tasks of the FMS (eg, deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge), unilateral drop jumps, and 36.6-meter sprints. A 3-dimensional motion analysis system captured MJH. Force platforms measured COP excursion. A laser timing system measured 36.6-m sprint time. Statistical analyses were used to determine whether a relationship existed between lunge scores and COP, MJH, and 36.6-m speed (Spearman rho tests) and whether differences existed between limbs in lunge scores (Wilcoxon signed-rank test), MJH, and COP (paired t tests).

RESULTS:

Lunge scores were not significantly correlated with COP, MJH, or 36.6-m sprint time. Lunge scores, COP excursion, and MJH were not statistically different between limbs.

CONCLUSION:

Performance on the FMS in-line lunge was not related to balance, power, or speed. Healthy participants were symmetrical in lunging measures and MJH.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Scores on the FMS in-line lunge should not be attributed to power, speed, or balance performance without further examination. However, assessing limb symmetry appears to be clinically relevant.

KEYWORDS:

limb dominance; screening; symmetry; unilateral

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