Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2014 May 2;4:4809. doi: 10.1038/srep04809.

Diffusion tensor imaging reveals acute subcortical changes after mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
1] Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, The Uniformed Services University, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 [2] Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, The Uniformed Services University, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814.
2
1] Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Room B1N256 MSC 1074, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 [2].
3
US Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Affairs Central Office, 810 Vermont Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20420.
4
Blast-Induced Neurotrauma Branch, Center for Military Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, 503 Robert Grant Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910.
5
Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Room B1N256 MSC 1074, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892.
6
Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, The Uniformed Services University, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814.

Abstract

Mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury (mbTBI) poses special diagnostic challenges due to its overlapping symptomatology with other neuropsychiatric conditions and the lack of objective outcome measures. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can potentially provide clinically relevant information toward a differential diagnosis. In this study, we aimed to determine if single and repeated (5 total; administered on consecutive days) mild blast overpressure exposure results in detectable structural changes in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. Fixed rat brains were analyzed by ex vivo DTI at 2 h and 42 days after blast (or sham) exposure(s). An anatomy-based region of interest analysis revealed significant interactions in axial and radial diffusivity in a number of subcortical structures at 2 h only. Differences between single- and multiple-injured rats were largely in the thalamus but not the hippocampus. Our findings demonstrate the value and the limitations of DTI in providing a better understanding of mbTBI pathobiology.

PMID:
24786839
PMCID:
PMC4019232
DOI:
10.1038/srep04809
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center