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Viruses. 2014 Apr 29;6(5):1897-910. doi: 10.3390/v6051897.

Molecular phylogeny of hantaviruses harbored by insectivorous bats in Côte d'Ivoire and Vietnam.

Author information

1
Pacific Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Research, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. sehungu@hawaii.edu.
2
Department of Natural History, Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, ON M5S 2C6, Canada. burtonl@rom.on.ca.
3
Department of Biology, Université de Cocody, Abidjan 22, Côte d'Ivoire. blaisekadjo1@hotmail.com.
4
Infectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo 162-8640, Japan. arais@nih.go.jp.
5
Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705, Korea. youminlove3@hotmail.com.
6
Departement Systematique et Evolution, UMR CNRS 7205, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris 75005, France. vnicolas@mnhn.fr.
7
Departement Systematique et Evolution, UMR CNRS 7205, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris 75005, France. lalis@mnhn.fr.
8
Departement Systematique et Evolution, UMR CNRS 7205, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris 75005, France. denys@mnhn.fr.
9
Department of Biology, Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA. cookjose@unm.edu.
10
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. samuel.dominguez@ucdenver.edu.
11
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Kathryn.Holmes@ucdenver.edu.
12
National Center for Disease Control and Public Health, Tbilisi 0177, Georgia. lelincdc@gmail.com.
13
National Center for Disease Control and Public Health, Tbilisi 0177, Georgia. keti_sida@yahoo.com.
14
National Center for Disease Control and Public Health, Tbilisi 0177, Georgia. dato.putkaradze@yahoo.com.
15
Pacific Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Research, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. burtonl@rom.on.ca.
16
Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705, Korea. jwsong@korea.ac.kr.
17
Pacific Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Research, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. ryanagih@hawaii.edu.

Abstract

The recent discovery of genetically distinct hantaviruses in multiple species of shrews and moles prompted a further exploration of their host diversification by analyzing frozen, ethanol-fixed and RNAlater®-preserved archival tissues and fecal samples from 533 bats (representing seven families, 28 genera and 53 species in the order Chiroptera), captured in Asia, Africa and the Americas in 1981-2012, using RT-PCR. Hantavirus RNA was detected in Pomona roundleaf bats (Hipposideros pomona) (family Hipposideridae), captured in Vietnam in 1997 and 1999, and in banana pipistrelles (Neoromicia nanus) (family Vespertilionidae), captured in Côte d'Ivoire in 2011. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the full-length S- and partial M- and L-segment sequences using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, demonstrated that the newfound hantaviruses formed highly divergent lineages, comprising other recently recognized bat-borne hantaviruses in Sierra Leone and China. The detection of bat-associated hantaviruses opens a new era in hantavirology and provides insights into their evolutionary origins.

PMID:
24784569
PMCID:
PMC4036548
DOI:
10.3390/v6051897
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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