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Nat Commun. 2014 Apr 29;5:3736. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4736.

Hydrochromic conjugated polymers for human sweat pore mapping.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.
2
Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.
3
1] Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea [2] Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.
4
Department of Electronic Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.
5
Department of Chemical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Youngin-Si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701, Korea.
6
Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.
7
1] Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea [2] Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.

Abstract

Hydrochromic materials have been actively investigated in the context of humidity sensing and measuring water contents in organic solvents. Here we report a sensor system that undergoes a brilliant blue-to-red colour transition as well as 'Turn-On' fluorescence upon exposure to water. Introduction of a hygroscopic element into a supramolecularly assembled polydiacetylene results in a hydrochromic conjugated polymer that is rapidly responsive (<20 μs), spin-coatable and inkjet-compatible. Importantly, the hydrochromic sensor is found to be suitable for mapping human sweat pores. The exceedingly small quantities (sub-nanolitre) of water secreted from sweat pores are sufficient to promote an instantaneous colorimetric transition of the polymer. As a result, the sensor can be used to construct a precise map of active sweat pores on fingertips. The sensor technology, developed in this study, has the potential of serving as new method for fingerprint analysis and for the clinical diagnosis of malfunctioning sweat pores.

PMID:
24781362
PMCID:
PMC4015324
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4736
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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