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Immunol Cell Biol. 2014 Aug;92(7):605-11. doi: 10.1038/icb.2014.28. Epub 2014 Apr 29.

CD154+ CD4+ T-cell dependence for effective memory influenza virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses.

Author information

1
Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
2
Division of Immunology, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
3
1] Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia [2] Department of Immunology, St Judes Childrens Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.

Abstract

CD40-CD154 (CD40 ligand) interactions are essential for the efficient priming of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. This is typically via CD4(+)CD154(+) T-cell-dependent 'licensing' of CD40(+) dendritic cells (DCs); however, DCs infected with influenza A virus (IAV) upregulate CD154 expression, thus enabling efficient CTL priming in the absence of CD4(+) T activation. Therefore, it is unclear whether CD4 T cells and DCs have redundant or unique roles in the priming of primary and secondary CTL responses after infection. Here we determine the precise cellular interactions involved in CD40-CD154 regulation of both primary and secondary IAV-specific CTL responses. Infection of both CD40 KO and CD154 KO mice resulted in diminished quantitative and qualitative CTL responses after both primary and secondary infection. Adoptive transfer of CD154(+), but not CD154 KO, CD4 T cells into CD154 KO mice restored both primary and secondary IAV-specific CD8 T-cell responses. These data show that, although CD154 expression on CD4 T cells and other cell types (that is, DCs) may be redundant for the priming of primary CTL responses, CD154 expression by CD4 T cells is required for the priming memory CD8 T cells that are capable of fully responding to secondary infection.

PMID:
24777309
DOI:
10.1038/icb.2014.28
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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